70 years later, there's been a new development in a groundbreaking case involving civil rights.

According to US News, a team searching the basement of a Mississippi courthouse for evidence about the lynching of black teenager Emmett Till has found the unserved warrant charging a white woman in his 1955 kidnapping.

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Relatives of the victim who initiated the hunt want authorities to finally arrest her nearly 70 years later.

US News states that the warrant for the arrest of Carolyn Bryant, Donham, identified as Mrs. Roy Bryan on the document was discovered last week inside a file folder that has been placed in a box on the floor County Circuit Clerk Elmus Stockstill told The Associated Press.

The Emmit Till case is easily one of the biggest cases when it comes to civil rights.

According to US News evidence indicates a woman who's possibly dying him identified till two men who later killed him the case was originally set off in August of 1955. After Donham accused the 14-year-old Till of making improper advances at a family store.

According to History.com, Donham's husband and his brother made it to carry a 75-pound cotton gin fan to the bank of Tallahatchie River and ordered him to take off his clothes. The two men beat him nearly to death gouged out his eye, shot him in my head, and threw his body tied to the cotton gin fan with barbed wire into the river.

Years later, with this new discovery, it's possible that Donham could be arrested.

Severe crimes such as murder typically have no maximum statute of limitations period in the United States so it's very well possible that  Donham could face charges for the 1955 warrant.

For more information on this recent development, visit US News.

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