Today, the nation celebrates the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I enjoy this day because we get an opportunity to remember his accomplishments. As a social activist, Dr. King played an instrumental role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Of course, in school, we learned Dr. King’s most iconic speech, “I Have a Dream.” According to the History channel, it was a “spirited call for peace and equality that many consider a masterpiece of rhetoric.” I wish that many would go back over the speech and gain clarity on peace and equality for all. I know it’s a wish but what we have learned from Dr. King is that it is ok to have a dream.

Today, I always like to say thank you to Dr. King. All should appreciate his outlook on life and position on uplifting people. “Thank you” seems so small in comparison to what he did for our country.

I have many favorite Dr. King quotes. One is the most profound, “Only in darkness can you see the stars.” It’s factual but straightforward. Even in life’s darkest moments, you can see the stars.

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I grew up on some very iconic figures. In my household, we cherished the Pope (we are Catholic), our ancestors, JFK, and MLK. My father would always say that we would be in a different type of world if John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. were not assassinated.

My father related to JFK and MLK because they were somewhat all in the same age group. John F. Kennedy was born in 1917, my father in 1924, and Martin Luther King Jr. in 1929. I believe he had the same outlook as JFK and MLK on many topics.

Enjoy the celebrations today honoring MLK. If you like to learn more about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. the History Channel is always a great resource to learn about such significant figures in our world, past, and present.

(Source) Click here for more from The History Channel

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